An expansion of my Invasive Pigments project (in which I make watercolor paints from wild-growing urban plants) this installation compares the hues of two distinct plant communities: the urban meadow and the research meadow. Made of plant materials drawn from the land surrounding a remote research station in the Rocky Mountains, the Gothic paintings reflect the plant composition of a meadow that has been carefully studied, manipulated and protected by humans for close to a century. The Bushwick paintings are made of pigments extracted from plants that live on the margins of a harsh urban landscape and are often derided as noxious weeds.

Two-Meadows-install

Drawings from the installation Hue Dichotomies: Two Meadows, comparing plant pigments from the Rocky Mountain Biological Lab in Gothic, Colorado (right) and my local plant population in Bushwick (left)
Drawings from the installation Hue Dichotomies: Two Meadows, comparing plant pigments from the Rocky Mountain Biological Lab in Gothic, Colorado (right) and my local plant population in Bushwick (left)
detail-3
Left: Urban Meadow Transect (May-October, Bushwick, Brooklyn), 2015 pencil and plant pigments from nineteen spontaneous plant species on paper 7 x 5” Right: Feral Hues and Herbicides (Bushwick, Brooklyn), 2015 pencil and plant pigments from 23 spontaneous plants on paper 7 x 5”
Left: Urban Meadow Transect (May-October, Bushwick, Brooklyn), 2015
pencil and plant pigments from nineteen spontaneous plant species on paper
7 x 5”
Right: Feral Hues and Herbicides (Bushwick, Brooklyn), 2015
pencil and plant pigments from 23 spontaneous plants on paper
7 x 5”