Detail: Comparative Color Palette, RMBL, June 2015
Detail: Comparative Color Palette, RMBL, June 2015

The pieces in this series explore the divergent origins of two sources of bright color in the relatively undeveloped landscape around the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory. They were created during my time there as an Art-Science Exchange resident in June, 2015. The colors displayed in the wildflowers on the left evolved over generations of coevolution between plants and pollinators. Colorful blossoms are one way plants can help their pollinators find them amongst a mass of spring greenery. The color they contribute to the landscape is ephemeral, but also cyclical and thus enduring. On the right is a collection of human-made artifacts found in and among fields of spring wildflowers. Colors used for flagging, signage, snack packages and beverage containers come in a range of vibrant hues. These objects have been designed by humans to attract the human eye, but fade and degrade quickly when exposed to the sun. They loose their original purpose, but remain in the landscape as they fall apart into smaller and smaller pieces of synthetic matter. Both sets of objects add to the visual complexity of the landscape around the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory, and, at least to the human eye, the two can appear interchangeable at a distance.

Comparative Color Palette: Eco-waste and Wildflowers, Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory, Gunnison National Forest, Colorado, June 2015.
Comparative Color Palette: Eco-waste and Wildflowers, Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory, Gunnison National Forest, Colorado, June 2015.
Wildflower Topography
Wildflower Topography
Eco-waste Topography
Eco-waste Topography